unconditional release | Definition

Doc's CJ Glossary by Adam J. McKee
Course: Introduction

 

Unconditional release refers to the release of a prisoner from custody without any conditions or restrictions placed on their freedom.


Unconditional release is a legal term used in the prison context to describe the release of a prisoner without any conditions or restrictions placed on their freedom. It allows the person to go about their life as they choose, without supervision or requirements to meet.

Unconditional release from prison may occur when a prisoner has served their full sentence, or when a parole board or judge has determined that the prisoner no longer poses a threat to society and can safely be released without any conditions. Unconditional release is different from other types of release, such as parole, which may be conditional and subject to certain conditions and restrictions.

Unconditional release is typically granted when a prisoner has demonstrated a significant level of rehabilitation and no longer poses a danger to society (Skeem & Monahan, 2011). However, it is important to note that unconditional release does not guarantee that the individual will not reoffend in the future.

From a legal standpoint, an individual who has been unconditionally released from prison has the same rights and privileges as any other citizen, including the right to vote, work, and travel freely. However, some limitations may apply in certain situations, such as in cases where the individual’s criminal record may prevent them from obtaining certain types of employment or housing.

Unconditional release from prison is an important concept in the criminal justice system, representing a determination that the prisoner no longer poses a danger to society and can safely function in the community. However, it is important to balance the need for public safety with the need to provide opportunities for rehabilitation and reintegration into society.

References:

Skeem, J. L., & Monahan, J. (2011). Current directions in violence risk assessment. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 24(4), 331-336.


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Last Modified: 03/14/2023

 

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