Breed v. Jones

In Breed v. Jones, the Court addressed whether a defendant convicted of a crime in one state can be extradited to another state to face charges for a separate crime. The Court ruled that a defendant can be extradited to another state to face charges for a separate crime, as long as the two states have an extradition treaty in place and the defendant’s due process rights are protected.

Extradition is a legal process that allows individuals who have been charged with a crime in one state to be transferred to another state to face trial. In the juvenile justice context, extradition may be used when a juvenile is charged with a crime in one state and then flees to another state to avoid prosecution. In such cases, the state in which the juvenile is located may seek to have them extradited back to the original state to face charges.

 


[ Glossary ]


 

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