breach of the peace

In criminal law, a breach of the peace is an act or conduct that is likely to cause a disturbance or a disruption of public order.


This can include actions such as fighting, making loud noises, threatening others, or behaving in a way that is likely to cause alarm or fear in others.

Breach of the peace is generally considered to be a relatively minor offense, and it is often punishable by a fine or a short term of imprisonment. However, the specific consequences for a breach of the peace can vary depending on the jurisdiction and the specific circumstances of the offense.

In some cases, a breach of the peace may be considered a “catch-all” offense that can be used to charge individuals with a crime when there is no other specific offense that applies to their conduct. This can be controversial, as it allows law enforcement to charge individuals with a crime when their actions may not be clearly criminal under other laws.


[ Glossary ]


 

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